What Should I Ask At the End of My Interview?

 

As you near the end of a job interview, you may be asked if you have any questions for the interviewer. This is a critical moment that should not be wasted. Asking thoughtful and strategic questions can not only help you gather important information about the role and company, but also increase your likeability factor and build a positive rapport with the interviewer. In this article, we will explore the best approach to asking questions at the end of an interview and provide you with a comprehensive list of questions to ask based on the different interviewers you may encounter.

 

Asking Questions at the End of an Interview: A Strategy for Success

When it comes to asking questions at the end of an interview, it is crucial to have a strategy in mind. Remember that the interviewer is evaluating two main factors: your competence for the job and your fit within the team and company culture. The questions you ask can help address both of these factors.

First and foremost, the purpose of asking questions at the end of an interview is to increase your likeability factor and build a relationship with the interviewer. This means bringing energy and engagement to the conversation. It is not about grilling the interviewer or creating an oppositional dynamic. By asking high-quality questions, you can impress the interviewer with your curiosity and thoughtfulness.

Additionally, it is important to ensure that your own career non-negotiables are met. If you have specific requirements around geography, remote work, or compensation, make sure to address them in the initial conversation with a recruiter or HR representative. This will save you time and prevent any potential disappointment later in the process.

Questions to Ask Based on the Interviewer

 

The types of questions you ask at the end of an interview should vary depending on the role and level of the interviewer. Here are some suggested questions for different types of interviewers:

Recruiter or HR Representative

  • What is the budgeted salary range for the role?
  • What are the typical benefits offered to employees?
  • What are the requirements for in-office work?
  • Is this role a backfill or a newly created position?
  • Can you tell me more about the team structure and who I would be reporting to?
  • How soon are you looking to fill this role?
  • What is the expected timeline for the interview process?
  • What is the process like, and how many interviews are typically conducted?
  • Are there any hard non-negotiables for this role, such as work permit status?

Hiring Manager or Stakeholder

  • What are the strengths needed for someone to succeed in this role?
  • What are the projects or initiatives that this person would be responsible for?
  • Who are the stakeholders or teams that I would be working closely with?
  • How would you describe the culture of the team?
  • What are some of the biggest challenges the team is currently facing?
  • How does your team approach learning and development?
  • What is the day-to-day role like for someone in this position?
  • What is your favorite part about working here, or what surprised you when you joined the organization?
  • Who do you believe doesn’t succeed in this company or on this team?

Executive or VP Level

  • Can you tell me more about the company’s broader strategic direction?
  • What are the biggest priorities and challenges the company is currently facing?
  • How does your group’s vision fit into the larger company’s goals?
  • How would you describe the culture of your group, or how are you trying to change the culture?
  • What are some of the problems the company is actively trying to solve?
  • What is the value that this team brings to the table?
  • What are some of the strongest selling points for this company from an employee experience perspective?
  • What does internal mobility look like within the company?

HR Business Partner

  • What is the grade level for this role?
  • What is the next role that someone in this position would likely be promoted into?
  • How long does it typically take for someone to get promoted?
  • How are promotion decisions made?
  • What does performance management look like within the company?
  • What types of resources are available for learning and professional development?
  • What do you think are some of the strongest selling points for this company from an employee experience perspective?
  • Is there anything else I should know about this team or the team it partners with?

What Not to Ask

While it is important to ask questions, there are certain types of questions that should be avoided. Here are some examples:

Questions that are easily searchable online: Avoid asking questions that can be easily found through a quick Google search. This shows a lack of preparation and interest.

Repetitive questions: Once you have asked a question, there is no need to ask the same question to multiple interviewers. Focus on asking different questions to gather a variety of information.

HR-related questions: Save questions about benefits, compensation, and work-life balance for the initial conversation with a recruiter or HR representative. These questions are not appropriate for the interviewers who are assessing your fit for the role and team.

Negative or controversial questions: Avoid asking questions that force the interviewer to discuss negative aspects of the company or put them on the spot. Keep the conversation positive and focused on building a relationship.

Questions that test or grill the interviewer: Asking questions that test the interviewer’s knowledge or put them in an uncomfortable position is not recommended. Remember, the purpose of this conversation is to build rapport, not to interview the interviewer.

 

 

Asking questions at the end of an interview is a valuable opportunity to gather important information, increase your likeability factor, and build a positive relationship with the interviewer. By following a strategic approach and asking high-quality questions, you can leave a lasting impression and increase your chances of moving forward in the hiring process. Remember to tailor your questions based on the type of interviewer and avoid asking questions that are easily searchable or repetitive. With the right questions, you can demonstrate your interest, curiosity, and fit for the role and company.

Loving this episode? Leave us a review if you’re listening on Apple podcasts and be sure to follow us on Instagram!